Ayeye thipe-akerte

Therese Ryder, 2017. Photo by Rhett Hammerton, courtesy of ICTV.

The Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics and Batchelor Institute Press are proud to present:

Ayeye Thipe-akerte

Arrernte Stories about Birds

By Eastern Arrernte artist and writer Therese Ryder.

Iwenhenge the pipe nhenhe mpwareke apele, ayenge ampe putyelenge amangkeke. Thipe nhenhe mapeke akaltye-irremele akngerrapate mapele iletyarte awemele – arrpenheme, kere anwerne-kenhe, arrpenhe mape anwerne arlkwentye akngerre kwenye arle.

My reason why I made this book was that I grew up in the bush. I learned about these birds from my elders – about the birds we see as food, and the other birds that are not food for us.

Therese Ryder

This project combines Therese’s exquisite watercolour paintings of birds from Central Australia with their Arrernte names and short stories about their appearance, habits and cultural meanings. The book has been published with a companion app, which allows readers to hear the sounds of the birds, their Arrernte names and the Arrernte stories.


To buy a copy of the book, contact Batchelor Institute Press

orders@batchelorpress.com

+61 (8) 8939 7352


To download the app, visit the app store or google play and search on ayeye thipe-akerte, or follow these links.

Bird call and song audio for the Ayeye Thipe-akerte app has been reproduced under licence from David Stewart, Nature Sounds


Click here to download a glossary and language notes (coming soon).

Click here for the flyer

Click here for more about the Getting in Touch Bird App project

Getting in Touch is a partnership with the Research Unit for Indigenous Language at the University of Melbourne


Ayeye awetyeke nhenhe

You can listen to the stories here